Our Privacy Notice has been updated to explain how we use cookies, which you accept by continuing to use this website. To withdraw your consent, see Your Choices.
0

All About Our Speakers

Get to know our lineup of speakers -- who will share their insights, strategies, and experiences, and engage you in meaningful discussions surrounding our current economic landscape.


Betsey Stevenson

Professor of Economics
University of Michigan

Betsey Stevenson is a professor of public policy and economics at the University of Michigan. She is also a faculty research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a visiting associate professor of economics at the University of Sydney, a research fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research, a fellow of the Ifo Institute for Economic Research in Munich, and serves on the executive committee of the American Economic Association. She served as a member of the Council of Economic Advisers from 2013 to 2015 where she advised President Obama on social policy, labor market, and trade issues. She served as the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor from 2010 to 2011, advising the Secretary of Labor on labor policy and participating as the secretary's deputy to the White House economic team. She has held previous positions at Princeton University and at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School.

Dr. Stevenson is a labor economist who has published widely in leading economics journals about the labor market and the impact of public policies on outcomes both in the labor market and for families as they adjust to changing labor market opportunities. Her research explores women's labor market experiences, the economic forces shaping the modern family, and how these labor market experiences and economic forces on the family influence each other. She is a columnist for Bloomberg View, and her analysis of economic data and the economy are frequently covered in both print and television media.

Dr Stevenson earned a B.A. in economics and mathematics from Wellesley College and an M.A. and Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. 


Justin Wolfers

Professor of Economics
University of Michigan

Justin Wolfers is a professor of public policy and economics. He also serves as a member of the Congressional Budget Office Panel of Economic Advisers. Wolfers' research interests include labor economics, macroeconomics, political economy, social policy, law and economics, and behavioral economics. Previously, Wolfers was an associate professor of business and public policy at the University of Pennsylvania and a visiting professor at Princeton University. He is a research associate with the National Bureau for Economic Research, a senior fellow of the Brookings Institution, a senior fellow of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, a research affiliate with the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London, and an international research fellow at the Kiel Institute for the World Economy in Germany. He is also a contributing columnist with The New York Times. Justin earned a bachelor's degree in economics from the University of Sydney and his AM and PhD in economics from Harvard University.


Paul Krugman

Distinguished Professor of Economics, Graduate Center of the City University of New York
Columnist for The New York Times

Paul Krugman, recipient of the 2008 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, taught at Princeton University for 14 years. In 2015, he joined the faculty of the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, associated with the Luxembourg Income Study, which tracks and analyzes income inequality around the world. He received his BA from Yale and his PhD from MIT. Before Princeton, he taught at Yale, Stanford, and MIT. He also spent a year on the staff of the Council of Economic Advisers in 1982–1983. His research has included trailblazing work on international trade, economic geography, and currency crises. In 1991, Krugman received the American Economic Association’s John Bates Clark medal. In addition to his teaching and academic research, Krugman writes extensively for nontechnical audiences. He is a regular op-ed columnist for The New York Times. His best-selling trade books include End This Depression Now!, The Return of Depression Economics and, The Crisis of 2008, a history of recent economic troubles and their implications for economic policy, and The Conscience of a Liberal, a study of the political economy of economic inequality and its relationship with political polarization from the Gilded Age to the present. His earlier books, Peddling Prosperity and The Age of Diminished Expectations, have become modern classics.


Tyler Cowen

Holbert L. Harris Chair of Economics
George Mason University

Tyler Cowen is Holbert L. Harris Chair of Economics at George Mason University and serves as chairman and faculty director of the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. With colleague Alex Tabarrok, Cowen is coauthor of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution and cofounder of the online educational platform Marginal Revolution University.

A dedicated writer and communicator of economic ideas, Cowen is the author of several bestselling books and is widely published in academic journals and the popular media. Cowen’s latest book is Big Business: A Love Letter to an American Antihero, which Cass Sunstein described as ""iconoclastic, charming, [and] wise"" and as ""essential reading."" He writes a column for Bloomberg View; has contributed extensively to national publications such as the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Money.

Cowen is host of Conversations with Tyler, a popular podcast series featuring today's most underrated thinkers in wide-ranging explorations of their work, the world, and everything in between. 

In 2011, Bloomberg Businessweek profiled Cowen as “America’s Hottest Economist” after his e-book, The Great Stagnation, appeared twice on the New York Times e-book bestseller list. Columnist David Brooks declared it “the most debated nonfiction book so far this year.” Foreign Policy named Cowen as one of 2011’s “Top 100 Global Thinkers,” and an Economist survey counted him as one of the most influential economists of the last decade.


Eric Chiang

Professor of Economics
Florida Atlantic University

Eric P. Chiang received his bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Nevada Las Vegas and his master’s and doctorate in economics from the University of Florida. His first academic position was at New Mexico State University. Currently, Eric is an associate professor and graduate director of the Department of Economics at Florida Atlantic University. Eric also serves as the director of instructional technology for the College of Business.
In 2009 Eric was the recipient of Florida Atlantic University’s highest teaching honor, the Distinguished Teacher of the Year Award. Among numerous other teaching awards, he also was named the Stewart Distinguished Professor at the College of Business. He has written over 35 articles in peer-reviewed journals on a range of subjects, including technology spillovers, intellectual property rights, telecommunications, and health care. His research has appeared in leading journals, including the Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Technology Transfer, and Southern Economic Journal. He is a frequent presenter at major economics conferences and at universities across the country and around the world.



Alex Tabarrok

Bartley J. Madden Chair in Economics
George Mason University

Alex Tabarrok is Bartley J. Madden Chair in Economics at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and a professor of economics at George Mason University. He specializes in patent-system reform, the effectiveness of bounty hunters compared to the police, how judicial elections bias judges, and how local poverty rates impact trial decisions by juries. He also examines methods for increasing the supply of human organs for transplant, the regulation of pharmaceuticals by the FDA, and voting systems.

Tabarrok is the coauthor, with Mercatus colleague Tyler Cowen, of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution and cofounder of the online educational platform Marginal Revolution University. He is the coauthor of Modern Principles of Economics, and author of the recent e-book Launching the Innovation Renaissance. His articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and many other prestigious publications.

Tabarrok received his PhD in economics from George Mason University and was a Mercatus Center PhD Fellow.


Steven Levitt

William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor of Economics, University of Chicago

Steve Levitt is the William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, where he directs the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory. He earned a BA from Harvard University and his PhD from MIT. He has taught at the University of Chicago since 1997. In 2004, Levitt was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal and in 2006, he was named one of Time's magazine's "100 People Who Shape Our World." He co-authored Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics, and is also the co-author of the popular Freakonomics Blog.


Chad Syverson

Professor of Economics, University of Chicago

Chad Syverson is an associate editor of the Rand Journal of Economics, an editorial board member of the B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research in the Productivity, Industrial Organization, Environmental and Energy Economics, and EFG Programs. He also serves on the board of the Chicago Census Research Data Center. Prior to these appointments, Syverson was visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis and a mechanical engineer co-op for Loral Defense Systems and Unisys Corporations. 


Greg Mankiw

Professor of Economics, Harvard University

N. Gregory Mankiw is the Robert M. Beren Professor of Economics at Harvard University. He began his study of economics at Princeton University, where he received an A.B. in 1980. After earning a Ph.D. in economics from MIT, he began teaching at Harvard in 1985 and was promoted to full professor in 1987. At Harvard, he has taught both undergraduate and graduate courses in macroeconomics.


Omari Swinton

Professor of Economics, Howard University

Howard University associate professor of economics, Omari H. Swinton, Ph.D., is now president of the National Economic Association (NEA), an organization dedicated to producing and distributing knowledge of economic issues that are of exceptional interest to promoting economic growth among people of color.


Ebonya Washington

Professor of Economics, Yale University

Ebonya L. Washington is Samuel C. Park Jr. Professor of Economics at Yale University. She is also a National Bureau of Economic Research Faculty Research Fellow in the Programs on Political Economy and the Economics of Children.


Gary Hoover

Professor of Economics, University of Oklahoma

Gary Hoover is the Department Chair of Economics at the University of Oklahoma. He is the founding editor of the Journal of Economics, Race and Policy.


Mauro Guillén

Professor of Economics, University of Pennsylvania

Mauro F. Guillén is the holder of the Zandman Endowed Professorship in International Management at the Wharton School. He served as Director of the Lauder Institute of Management & International Studies between 2007 and 2019. He received a PhD in sociology from Yale University and a Doctorate in political economy from the University of Oviedo in his native Spain.



Jonathan Meer

Professor of Economics, Texas A&M University

Jonathan Meer is the Mary Julia and George R. Jordan, Jr. Professor of Public Policy in the Department of Economics at Texas A&M University, where he is also the department's Director of Undergraduate Programs. He is also a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research.


Trevon Logan

Professor of Economics, Ohio State University

Trevon D'Marcus Logan is the Hazel C. Youngberg Trustees Distinguished Professor in the Department of Economics at The Ohio State University, where he was awarded the 2014 Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching, and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research.


Kalina Staub

Professor of Economics, University of North Carolina

Kalina Staub is a professor of Economics at the University of North Carolina. She is an applied microeconomist whose research has focused on marriage formation and dissolution in the US. More recently, she has become interested in exploring effective teaching strategies in the economics classroom.


Stacey Vanek-Smith

Co-Host of NPR's The Indicator from Planet Money

Stacey Vanek Smith is the co-host of NPR's The Indicator from Planet Money. She's also a correspondent for Planet Money, where she covers business and economics.




Macmillan Learning

One New York Plaza
New York, NY 10004-1562

Copyright © 2011 - 2018
Macmillan Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.

Macmillan Learning Community

Support. Teach. Learn. Connect.